Monday, September 18, 2017

It's BLOOMING hot out here! What to do with bloomed chocolate.

By: Cecily Costa


Well #$@& happens and especially with all the hot weather we have received in the past few weeks, chocolate will bloom. But most importantly, don’t throw it out!

Chocolate bloom is a white powdery surface due to fat bloom or sugar bloom. This problem is due to incorrect storage of chocolate; either too warm or too cold. Fat bloom occurs when cocoa butter either does not crystallize properly or undergoes a phase transition when stored in warm or humid conditions. Fat bloomed chocolate feels 'oily' or 'greasy' due to surface layer of fat. Fortunately, fat bloom can be reversed by either tempering the chocolate or using it in a baked good where the chocolate will be warmed or cooled in similar way of the tempering process.

Sugar bloom occurs when sugar dissolves in surface moisture and recrystallizes, so do not store unwrapped chocolate in the fridge. Sugar-bloomed chocolate feels 'grainy' due to sugar deposits on the surface. Most importantly, sugar bloom is irreversible, so sugar-bloomed chocolate cannot be fixed (though you may be able to salvage it in a brownie recipe).

Chocolate with low cocoa butter content (like 32%) will have less than high cocoa butter content couvertures. If the chocolate is being used in baking (either as a chip or melted into the recipe) the quality won't be affected. If you are making molded truffles, the chocolate will need to tempered again.

Source: www.chem-is-you.blogspot.com “No Added Chemicals, The Chemistry of Chocolate”

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